The Foreign Slave Trade: The source of political power, of material progress, of social integrity, and of social emancipation to the South. L. W. Spratt.

By the "Philosopher of the new African slave trade"--Horace Greeley

The Foreign Slave Trade: The source of political power, of material progress, of social integrity, and of social emancipation to the South

Notes: 31 pages. A Southerner argues that a revived foreign slave trade was crucial to the Southern economy. Spratt believed that importing new slaves from Africa would reduce the price of slaves in the United States, lower labor costs, and bring slaves within the economic reach of the average Southern man. His views were not widely adopted, in large part because existing slave owners did not want to see their property devalued. Indeed, Virginia joined the Confederacy with the condition that the ban on imported slaves would be continued (see Conrad, In the Hands of Strangers, p. 427-428). NB: Your humble cataloguer is aware of the brutal violence obscured by bland phrases like "importing new slaves from Africa," as if woven baskets were the subject, instead of people. Sabin 89749.

Edition + Condition: First edition. Very good in original string-tied self wrappers. Old address and postmark on the blank back cover; the postage stamp has been removed.

Publication: Charleston: Steam Power Press of Walker, Evans & Co., 1858.

Item No: #5345

Price: $450